Into the grape unknown: the great Welsh wine tasting

The words ‘Welsh wine’ might once have raised a quizzical eyebrow, but no longer. As climate change has seen the terroir shift steadily north, even these wet, chilly hills can now produce a thoroughly decent drop. A growing crop of wineries have invested passion and effort to seriously raise the bar, embracing hardy, early ripening grape varieties suited to cool climates like Seyval, Phoenix and … Continue reading Into the grape unknown: the great Welsh wine tasting

Llansteffan: the greatest hits in one striking coastal Carmarthenshire hike

Distance: 7.25km (loop) or 13km (with 5.75km out-and-back extension). Carmarthenshire, being next-door neighbours with beach-perfect Pembrokeshire, often gets its 70-odd miles of coastline unfairly overlooked. But the county is no seaside flop. The estuary-indented seaboard embraces Wales’ longest beach (eight-mile-long Pembrey Sands), the shores where numerous land speed records including Malcolm Campbell’s got set (Pendine Sands), the spot where Amelia Earhart touched down to become … Continue reading Llansteffan: the greatest hits in one striking coastal Carmarthenshire hike

Road Trip: Llandovery to Tregaron via Llyn Brianne

This rollercoaster single-track run begins in Llandovery, on the cusp between the Brecon Beacons and the Cambrian Mountains of Mid Wales: a dinky, delightful market town seemingly designed for kickstarting road trips with its legendary bikers cafe. It whisks you through the verdant Upper Tywi Valley, via the winsome villages of Cilycwm and Rhandirmwym, up to the tentacular reservoir of Llyn Brianne, swooshing you through … Continue reading Road Trip: Llandovery to Tregaron via Llyn Brianne

Snow wonder: Wales’ other Sugar Loaf bares its white winter soul

There are hills that, though humble in height, captivate the imagination. Places that somehow draw you back time and again to their season-changing wilderness, their lonely trails, their idiosyncratic landscapes. Sugar Loaf (Sir Gaerfyrddin), a mere moor or two away from the endearingly odd town of Llanwrtyd Wells (of bog-snorkelling world championship and numerous other mad festivals fame), is one such place. The hill – … Continue reading Snow wonder: Wales’ other Sugar Loaf bares its white winter soul

Counting down the fifteen most authentic Welsh gift ideas – and the best places to purchase them

What better reminder of Wales than something beautiful to appreciate back home for yourself or your loved ones? At best, a Welsh souvenir embodies a bit of Wales’ history, culture or spirit – and a blend of wild geography, Celtic influences and abundance of time-lost, traditional regions where ancient crafts flourish has ensured this country keeps creating truly special products making for unique gifts. It … Continue reading Counting down the fifteen most authentic Welsh gift ideas – and the best places to purchase them

What it’s like to walk right around Wales: tips and tales from the trail with seasoned hiker Michelle Gollins

Few people can say they have walked the entire way around a country. Wales might have become the world’s first nation to have a footpath all along its borders with the completion of the Wales Coast Path (WCP) in 2012, therefore making the challenge more possible. But actually doing the hike, 870 miles on the WCP, another 177 miles on the Offa’s Dyke Path (ODP) … Continue reading What it’s like to walk right around Wales: tips and tales from the trail with seasoned hiker Michelle Gollins

Stargazing in the Cambrian Mountains at summer solstice with Dafydd Wyn Morgan

The Cambrian Mountains are home to some of the UK’s darkest night skies, with very little light pollution making for perfect stargazing conditions. We talk to Dafydd Wyn Morgan, project manager for Dyfodol Cambrian Futures, about the Cambrian Mountains Astro Trail that has recently put this remote, wild corner of Wales firmly on the celestial map. Taking in nine locations that have been awarded Milky … Continue reading Stargazing in the Cambrian Mountains at summer solstice with Dafydd Wyn Morgan

Paxton’s Tower: the fabulous folly far above the Tywi commemorating prospects lost

Protruding out of the wood-carpeted line of hills south of the River Tywi in bizarre neo-Gothic splendour, Paxton’s Tower is no retiring violet from the public eye – indeed it is among Carmarthenshire’s most distinctive landmarks – but its sheer comic oddness renders it the sort of spot we at Undiscovered Wales absolutely love. The surrounding parish of Llanarthne has, since 2000, become one of … Continue reading Paxton’s Tower: the fabulous folly far above the Tywi commemorating prospects lost

The great Welsh cheese-off: seven of the nation’s finest undiscovered cheeses face off in a taste-off, but which will be a cut above?

Despite all those cows and sheep scattered across the green hillsides, when it comes to naming famous Welsh cheeses most will get stumped right after Caerphilly. This National Cheese Day, we have hand-picked three of the many multi-award winning cheese producers across the country, each of which have hand-picked between one and three of their most iconic cheeses – we have (extensively!) tasted each, compared … Continue reading The great Welsh cheese-off: seven of the nation’s finest undiscovered cheeses face off in a taste-off, but which will be a cut above?

In search of the cave of Twm Siôn Cati, the Welsh Robin Hood

Walk length: 4km. In almost all countries, it seems, there is a Robin Hood figure, usually treading that hazy space between fact and fiction in history: someone who takes from the rich, gives to the poor and then gets heroised in popular culture. In Wales, it is Twm Siôn Cati: a canny 16th-century Mid Wales outlaw about whom reams of stories have been written but … Continue reading In search of the cave of Twm Siôn Cati, the Welsh Robin Hood