Carreg Coetan Arthur: Newport’s Neolithic surprise

It has happened to us on a few occasions in Pembrokeshire and never anywhere else ever. You are minding your own business, strolling through nondescript suburbia and wham, out of the bungalows and industrial estates materialises an archaeological site from several thousand years ago like a masterwork of Neolithic necromancy. You would be unlikely to chance upon the burial chamber of Carreg Coetan Arthur on … Continue reading Carreg Coetan Arthur: Newport’s Neolithic surprise

Caer Bwdy Bay, source of Pembrokeshire’s striking purple stone

Look at Pembrokeshire’s coastline closely, the extreme-west coastline snagging in madly-gouged cliffs and cave-mouths and coves and rock stacks and smashed reefs and bewitching brokenness around St Davids, and a colour you would not expect distinguishes itself. Purple. And not from the heather, but from Pembrokeshire’s purple stone, most famously gracing St Davids Cathedral, which characterises both the craggy seaboard and lots of the regional … Continue reading Caer Bwdy Bay, source of Pembrokeshire’s striking purple stone

The quirks and caves of Druidston Haven

On the jagged expanse of seaboard south of Newgale, the narrow coast-hugging road threads through the ‘Havens’, four seaside settlements known for their tawny sandy coves and beaches backed by craggy cliffs and a stupendous array of coastal geology. Because of how the maze of little lanes around here spread-eagles out, Druidston Haven is the one of the four you would bypass completely unless you … Continue reading The quirks and caves of Druidston Haven

Sweet temptation at The Plwmp Tart in Penbryn

Housed in a prettily converted stone cart house, the Plwmp Tart is everything a coastal cafe ought to be – and a lot more. The location is dreamy, for starters, with the cafe abutting sunlit beech woods that spill down to the bay of Penbryn. And organic and garden-grown ingredients go into light lunches and cakes – all made with a pinch of love. Why … Continue reading Sweet temptation at The Plwmp Tart in Penbryn

Between the sea and sky: Ynyslas Dunes

A vast, open expanse of sea and sky greeted us at the Ynyslas dunes. Rolling south of the Dyfi Estuary for as far as the eye can see, this dune dreamscape lifts gazes and spirits – particularly on a spring day, when a stiff breeze buffets the Irish Sea and clouds billow atmospherically in a sharp blue sky. Driving the Coastal Way, the 180-mile route … Continue reading Between the sea and sky: Ynyslas Dunes

Sacred solitude on Mwnt Beach

Sometimes, when you ask around in a local area for good off-the-grid recommendations of places to visit, you wind up disappointed or downright annoyed if you follow through with the suggestion and go there: local recommendations are not always great. Admittedly, Mwnt and its big USP, its beach, are a mere five miles from Cardigan, the second-largest town in the county of Ceredigion with its … Continue reading Sacred solitude on Mwnt Beach