Classic Nettle Frittata recipe courtesy of Argo Villa B&B, Pembrokeshire

Nettle frittata for the perfect spring brunch © Kerry Walker

Passionate about wild food and interesting flavours, Gill and Antosh Wislocki are the owners of Argo Villa B&B in St Dogmaels in Pembrokeshire. Every morning they cook up a storm for breakfast, using whatever is in season. This nettle frittata is a classic, made with a handful of fresh young nettle tops and – if you can get them – wild garlic leaves for an extra kick. 

Gill says: “Take care to only pick the young nettle tops (often only the top four leaves) with gloves. Old leaves are tough and bitter. If you want to repurpose this recipe to make a soup, simply use three good handfuls of tender nettle tops, leave out the eggs, and add more water and stock.”

Ingredients

2 tbsp oil

1 large onion, finely chopped

3 large potatoes, chopped into small cubes

3 tbsp water

1-2 generous handfuls of young nettle tops, finely chopped

A few wild garlic leaves if available, finely chopped

1 garlic clove (optional)

Salt, pepper and stock cube of your choice

4 eggs

Young nettle tops are best picked in spring © Kerry Walker

Method

Use a frying pan with a thick bottom and tight-fitting lid. Gently fry onions until golden. Add the water (you may need more of this than stated, add it gradually and only when mixture looks to be getting too dry during cooking), chopped nettles, potatoes and wild garlic, and cover with the lid. Sweat gently on a low heat, checking every 10 mins or so to make sure it doesn’t get dry. This can take 30 mins to an hour – perfect food to prepare while multi-tasking as it cooks so slowly. Add the salt and pepper/stock cube towards the end of this process. Beat the eggs and pour them over the potato and nettle mixture, giving everything a gentle stir to blend it together. Keep the lid on and cook until firm.

Sweating the potatoes and nettles to make the perfect frittata © Kerry Walker

Serving suggestion

Gently loosen the frittata underneath with a spatula, take a large plate or serving dish, place on top of the frying pan, grip everything firmly and turn upside down. The frittata should have a light golden base, which can be decorated with wild garlic flowers or tomato.

Undiscovered Wales found the result to be so, so different to your normal omelette – much more filling, because the potato is absorbing the liquid throughout cooking, and with a thicker, creamier consistency.

©Kerry Walker